We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live Reading Group, Glasgow Women’s Library

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We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live, (Detail: Selection of Titles by Lollipop Power, circa 1970s), 2017, Kim Dhillon

As part of my installation, We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live, at CCA Glasgow, I am running a series of reading groups through March at Glasgow Women’s Library to discuss some of these books and the ideas they explore. The groups will focus largely on the titles produced by Lollipop Power in the Chapel Hill area of North Carolina in the 1970s. The groups are facilitated by Dr Elsa Richardson.

1970s feminist children’s books sought to present stories that would broaden the possibilities for children and reflect a world for kids who wanted to grow up equal.

We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live reading group takes place on Thursdays 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th March, 5.30pm to 7pm

We’ll reflect on lead female characters; representations of fathers, grandparent carers and single, working mothers; and ask what was radical about children’s literature from the 1970s and how it can be today? Find all the sessions and book your place on the Glasgow Women’s Library website via this link.

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Work in Progress: We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live

I’m making a new work for CCA Glasgow, looking at 1970s non-sexist, multi-racial kids books made by feminist publishing collectives, particularly Lollipop Power who were in Chapel Hill in the early 70s. If everyone had been as ahead of the game as these women, maybe we wouldn’t be in the mess we’re in. They’re all nearly 70 now, and they’re still awesome. This is a back cover from The Sheep Book, by Carmen Goodyear, 1972.recycled

Coleen The Question Girl by Arlie Russell Hochschild: out now!

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Our revised edition of Arlie Russell Hochschild’s children’s book, first written in 1973 and published by the Feminist Press, is available for sale in hardcover on Blurb now!

Softcover on Amazon soon.

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Who’s Holding the Baby: Women’s Art Collectives Past and Present, Tate Britain

The Highest Product of Capitalism (after John Heartfield) 1979 by Jo Spence 1934-1992
The Highest Product of Capitalism (after John Heartfield) 1979 Jo Spence 1934-1992 Presented by Tate Patrons 2014 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P80406

I’ll be in conversation with artist Rose Gibbs at Tate Britain on Saturday 18 June, discussing the legacies of second wave feminism, labour, and care, particularly in response to the Jo Spence display as part of Conceptual Art in Britain. Event sold out, wait list being taken.

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Artists’ Talk: Kim Dhillon and Andrea Francke, The Serpentine

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Shapes, (Changing Play commission for the Serpentine, London at Portman Children’s Centre), Kim Dhillon and Andrea Francke, 2014-16

As part of our  commission with the Serpentine Galleries, Andrea Francke and I presented an artist’s talk at the gallery on 24 October 2015 which discussed the project, a partnership with the Portman’s Centre for Early Years Education, and the interrogation of early years education for a collaborative, research-based art practice.

You can watch the full talk here.

‘Mother and Child Divided’, Jennifer Thatcher

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Critic Jennifer Thatcher writes a feature about mothers in the UK art world in the July August 2015 issue of Art Monthly, and focuses on my projects Crib Notes and the campaign for childcare re-instatement at the RCA.

(“Mother and Child Divided,” Jennifer Thatcher, Art Monthly, 388, July-Aug 2015, pp. 11-14)

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Motherhood and Creative Practice

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On June 1 and 2, 2015 Andrea Francke and I participated in the conference Motherhood and Creative Practice at London Southbank University. Keynotes included Faith Wilding, Griselda Pollock, and Mary Kelly. A revised version of our paper “Politicising Motherhood: Creative Practice, Activism, and the Mother” will be published in an upcoming special issue of the international, peer reviewed journal, MaMSIE: Studies in the Maternal in Spring 2016.

(Image: still from Come Worry With Us! (2015, Helene Klodawsky)